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Animals and birds

Dogs and cats
Birds and animals in distress

Caring for dogs and cats

Provisions set out in the Animal Protection Act, the regulation of the Minister of Rural Affairs “Requirements for keeping pet animals” and rules for keeping cats and dogs in Tartu must be adhered to when keeping animals.

Persons keeping pets must comply with the following:

  • Ensure supervision of their cat or dog when on private property or in a public place. Keep their pet on a leash and use a dog muzzle, if necessary.
  • Ensure that dogs and cats cannot leave their property without supervision.
  • Promptly clean up their pet’s droppings.
  • Ensure that keeping a cat or a dog and that the behaviour of their cat or dog does not violate public order or disturb or endanger other people and animals.
  • Microchip their dog. Microchipping cats is voluntary. Pets can be provided with chips at veterinary clinics.
  • Register their dogs with the Estonian Small Animal Veterinary Association’s Estonian Pet Registry. Pets can be registered at veterinary clinics.

Pet owners must comply with prescribed requirements and ensure the welfare of their pet. Moreover, the rights of neighbours must also be taken into consideration. Keeping animals should not disturb your neighbours too much.

A dead pet can be buried on your own registered immovable or, with the permission of the owner, on the registered immovable of somebody else. If you bring a dead pet to the animal shelter, you will have to pay for the cremation of the body. Information about the pet cremation service can be obtained from the web page www.lemmikloomadekrematoorium.ee.

Microchipping dogs

It is obligatory to register dogs and implant them with a microchip. This enables animals to be identified more easily and for owners to track their missing pets faster. It is not obligatory to register and implant cats and other pets with microchips, but we highly recommend it.

Pets can be provided with chips and registered at veterinary clinics. You can find a list of veterinarians here: http://www.tartu.ee/et/koerte-kiibistamine

Containers for dog droppings

Containers for dog droppings have been installed in 27 places across Tartu. Locations can be found here: http://www.tartu.ee/et/loomad-ja-linnud#koerad-ja-kassid/Koerte-v%C3%A4ljaheidete-kastid

Pet owners must clean up after their pets. The penalty for a violation of said obligation is a fine of up to €383.50.

Tartu Animal Shelter

The Tartu Animal Shelter is located in the Raadi district at Roosi Street 91k. The shelter’s telephone +372 5333 9272 can be used to report stray or injured animals as well as any dead animals found in public areas of the city.

You can use the Environmental Board’s hotline 1313 to report emergencies involving wild animals and birds.

For more information see the website of the Tartu Animal Shelter.

Dog walking fields

The city’s designated dog walking field is located on the green area between Anne Canal and the Emajõgi River. The green area behind Eeden Shopping Centre includes enclosed areas for small and large dogs. Both fields feature two dog agility training elements complete with instructions on how to use them. The city takes care of regular maintenance and waste disposal in the dog park.

If you have any other questions or problems then feel free to contact NPO Tartu Koertepargid (Dog Parks in Tartu):
Mart Suurkask
telephone: +372 5340 2902
info@tartukoertepargid.ee

Last changed 27.04.2017

Birds and animals in distress

You can report stray or injured animals by calling the Tartu Animal Shelter’s telephone number +372 5333 9272. The same number should be used to report any dead animals found in public spaces. The shelter responds to calls from Mon. to Fri. between the hours of 8:00 and 20:00 and on Saturdays between 8:00 and 17:00.

Use the Environmental Inspectorate’s short number 1313 to report animals or birds in distress. You can also refer to the emergency number 112 to report emergencies related to wild animals and birds.

Photo: Juhan Voolaid
Photo: Juhan Voolaid

Last changed 27.04.2017